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dc.contributor.authorParker, Daniel M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-18T08:39:40Z-
dc.date.available2022-03-18T08:39:40Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.urihttps://openscholar.ump.ac.za/handle/20.500.12714/480-
dc.descriptionPlease note that only UMP researchers are shown in the metadata. To access the co-authors, please view the full text.en_US
dc.description.abstractSeed dispersal by chelonians (i.e. tortoises, turtles and terrapins) is geographically and taxonomically widespread, more so than any other reptilian groups (Falcón et al., 2020). Frugivorous chelonians are generally considered efficient seed dispersers, meaning that dispersal events facilitated by chelonians often result in the successful establishment of fertile plant recruits (i.e. the seed dispersal effectiveness framework; Schupp et al., 2010). Chelonians can consume large quantities of diverse fruit species, cause little damage to seed viability when consuming and digesting fruit, and transport seeds relatively great distances through long gut-retention times (Blake et al., 2012; Falcón et al., 2020). Thus, frugivorous chelonians can play an important role in maintaining ecosystem structure and functionality, so much so that giant tortoises are reintroduced onto islands to initiate the restoration of ecosystem processes (Falcón & Hansen, 2018). Chelonian frugivory and seed dispersal, however, are generally understudied with most case studies originating from Amazonian rainforests, North American deserts and tropical islands (Falcón et al., 2020). Yet, the seed dispersal effectiveness of chelonians in continental Africa has rarely been assessed (e.g. Milton, 1992; Setlalekgomo & Sesinyi, 2014).en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAfrican Journal of Ecologyen_US
dc.subjectPreliminary diet.en_US
dc.subjectHinge-back tortoise.en_US
dc.subjectKinixys zombensis.en_US
dc.subjectSeed disperser.en_US
dc.titlePreliminary diet record of hinge-back tortoise Kinixys zombensis: a potential seed disperser?en_US
dc.typejournal articleen_US
dc.relation.datasetData to reproduce manuscript analyses are available on figshare: https:// doi.org/10.6084/m9.figsh are.15027 972.v2 (Lloyd & Parker, 2021).en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/aje.12919-
dc.contributor.affiliationSchool of Biology and Environmental Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.issn1365-2028en_US
dc.description.volume60en_US
dc.description.issue1en_US
dc.description.startpage109en_US
dc.description.endpage112en_US
item.openairetypejournal article-
item.grantfulltextembargo_20500101-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_6501-
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.languageiso639-1en-
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